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Crying once a week can reduce stress – according to Japan’s “tears teacher”

I’ve often noticed I feel much better after crying it out with a friend –  or simply shedding a few tears watching a sad movie. It seems I’m not imagining the therapeutic benefits of crying. Crying once a week can help reduce stress – according to a range of studies.

A study was done on the effects of crying in 30 countries around the world (performed by Jonathan Rottenberg, Lauren M. Bylsma, and  J.J.M. Vingerhoets).

The results?

Universally people from all countries agreed: They felt better after crying.

Lately the country of Japan has been particularly embracing something called “crying therapies.”

For example…

Japanese entrepreneur, Hiroki Terai, launched a “group crying service” known as “rui-katsu” or “tear-seeking” – which encourages women to cry together as a group – while a “handsome weeping boy” wipes away their tears.

This service has been reported to be very effective at lowering stress – and has become extremely popular with women.  

“Crying therapies” are also becoming popular at Japanese schools and workplaces – thanks to Hidefumi Yoshida – who calls himself a “namida sensei” – which translates into tears teacher.”

Yoshida has been actively giving lectures about the importance of crying to companies and schools throughout Japan – encouraging children and people at work to go ahead and cry it out.

Yoshida told the Japan Times…

“The act of crying is more effective than laughing or sleeping in reducing stress. If you cry once a week, you can live a stress-free life.”

Yoshida has been doing everything he can to raise awareness of how crying can reduce stress.  

Yoshida teamed up with Hideho Arita, a professor emeritus at the Faculty of Medicine at Toho University to deeply research the benefits of crying

Together they found…

  • Crying slows down your breathing
  • Crying helps you relax
  • Crying stimulates the production of feel-good endorphins

Plus American researcher, Dr. William Frey, from the Ramsey Medical Center in Minneapolis, carried out a range of research studies into why humans cry.

Frey discovered there are 3 types of tears:

  • reflex, which clear away irritants;
  • continuous, which keep our eyes moist
  • emotional, which studies have found to have certain health benefits

Frey believes this last category of “emotional tears” help to “flush stress hormones out of our system.”

Frey calls this kind of tears: “psychogenic lacrimation.”

Meaning?

Next time you’re feeling stressed or depressed, maybe you just need some good “psychogenic lacrimation.” 

So, go ahead, grab a box of tissues and enjoy a good cry.

Think happier. Think calmer.

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Karen Salmansohn (Founder)

Hi I’m Karen Salmansohn, founder of NotSalmon. My mission is to offer you easy-to-understand insights and tools to empower you to bloom into your happiest, highest potential self. I use playful analogies, feisty humor, and stylish graphics to distill big ideas – going as far back as ancient wisdom from Aristotle, Buddhism and Darwin to the latest research studies from Cognitive Therapy, Neuro Linquistic Programming, Neuroscience, Positive Psychology, Quantum Physics, Nutritional Studies – and then some.

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